Indian Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine   Official publication of Indian Association of  0ccupational  Health  
 Print this page Email this page   Small font sizeDefault font sizeIncrease font size
 Users Online:785

  IAOH | Subscription | e-Alerts | Feedback | Login 

Home About us Current Issue Archives Search Instructions
   Next article
   Previous article
   Table of Contents

   Similar in PUBMED
     Search Pubmed for
     Search in Google Scholar for
   Related articles
    Citation Manager
    Access Statistics
    Reader Comments
    Email Alert *
    Add to My List *
 * Requires registration (Free)
 

 Article Access Statistics
    Viewed7923    
    Printed313    
    Emailed1    
    PDF Downloaded426    
    Comments [Add]    
    Cited by others 10    

Recommend this journal

 

 ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2008  |  Volume : 12  |  Issue : 3  |  Page : 132-135

Occupational health risks among the workers employed in leather tanneries at Kanpur


1 Epidemiology Division, Indian Institute of Toxicology Research, Post Box No. 80, Mahatma Gandhi Marg, Uttar Pradesh, India
2 Biochemistry, Hind Medical College, Lucknow - 226 001, Uttar Pradesh, India
3 Cardiovascular Toxicology, Indian Institute of Toxicology Research, Post Box No. 80, Mahatma Gandhi Marg, Uttar Pradesh, India

Correspondence Address:
Subodh Kumar Rastogi
Epidemiology Division, Indian Institute of Toxicology Research, Post Box No. 80, Mahatma Gandhi Marg, Lucknow - 226 001, Uttar Pradesh
India
Login to access the Email id

Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/0019-5278.44695

Rights and Permissions

In a cross-sectional study, a random sample of 197 male workers drawn from different sections of 10 leather tanneries in Kanpur were selected for the assessment of health risks. A control group comprising of 117 male subjects belonging to a similar age group and socioeconomic strata, who never had any occupational exposure in the leather tanneries, were also examined for the comparison purpose. The findings revealed a significantly higher prevalence of morbidity among the exposed workers in contrast to that observed in the controls (40.1% vs. 19.6%). The respiratory diseases (16.7%) were mainly responsible for a higher morbidity among the exposed workers whereas the gastrointestinal tract problems were predominant in the control group. The urinary and blood samples collected from the exposed group showed significantly higher levels of chromium, thereby reflecting the body burden of Cr in the exposed workers as a result of a high concentration of environmental Cr at the work place.






[FULL TEXT] [PDF]*


        
Print this article     Email this article