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Year : 2010  |  Volume : 14  |  Issue : 3  |  Page : 100-103

Etiological investigation of unintentional solvent exposure among university hospital staffs


Department of Preventive and Social Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Srinakharinwirot University, 114 Sukhumvit 23, Wattana, Bangkok, Thailand

Correspondence Address:
Chatchai Ekpanyaskul
Department of Preventive and Social Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Srinakharinwirot University, 114 Sukhumvit 23, Wattana, Bangkok - 101 10
Thailand
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Source of Support: Routine to research (R2R) grant from Faculty of Medicine, Srinakharinwirot University, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/0019-5278.75699

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Aim: This study was done to investigate unintentional solvent exposure in Srinakharinwirot university hospital staffs with unknown etiology. Material and Methods: A multidisciplinary investigation was conducted. Total volatile organic compounds (TVOCs) in working environments were measured. Biomarkers of exposure and self-administered questionnaires about clinical symptoms were collected, during and after the incidence, from the affected workers. Results: The reason behind this event was found to be renovation of the 15 th floor. TVOCs contaminated the air hanging unit of the lower 5th floor via space of the pipeline system of the building. The average TVOC value in the complaint area, on the date of notification, was 9.5 ppm. The symptoms and level of hippuric acid, collected during the incidence, were significantly higher than those collected after the problems were solved. Conclusions: The solvent from the renovation site was a potential source of health hazards for hospital staffs. The relevant authorities should be concerned about implementing a policy for the prevention of indoor pollution in the hospital.






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