Indian Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine   Official publication of Indian Association of  0ccupational  Health  
 Print this page Email this page   Small font sizeDefault font sizeIncrease font size
 Users Online:28

  IAOH | Subscription | e-Alerts | Feedback | Login 

Home About us Current Issue Archives Search Instructions
  Search
 
  
 
    Similar in PUBMED
     Search Pubmed for
     Search in Google Scholar for
    Article in PDF (235 KB)
    Citation Manager
    Access Statistics
    Reader Comments
    Email Alert *
    Add to My List *
* Registration required (free)  


   References

 Article Access Statistics
    Viewed1051    
    Printed39    
    Emailed0    
    PDF Downloaded36    
    Comments [Add]    

Recommend this journal

 


 
  Table of Contents 
LETTER TO THE EDITOR
Year : 2014  |  Volume : 18  |  Issue : 3  |  Page : 163
 

Cadmium toxicity in silversmith: Safety is never too much!


1 Department of Emergency and Critical Care Medicine, Sri Gokulam Hospitals and Research Institute, Salem, Tamil Nadu, India
2 Department of Anaesthesiology, Chennai Medical College and Research Center, Irungalur, Trichy, India
3 Department of Accident and Emergency Medicine, Fortis Hospital, Mulund, Mumbai, Maharashtra, India
4 Department of Internal Medicine, Chennai Medical College and Research Center, Irungalur, Trichy, India

Date of Web Publication12-Dec-2014

Correspondence Address:
Subramanian Senthilkumaran
Department of Emergency and Critical Care Medicine, Sri Gokulam Hospital, Salem, Tamil Nadu
India
Login to access the Email id

Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/0019-5278.146919

Rights and Permissions

 



How to cite this article:
Senthilkumaran S, Ananth C, Gore SB, Thirumalaikolundusubramanian P. Cadmium toxicity in silversmith: Safety is never too much!. Indian J Occup Environ Med 2014;18:163

How to cite this URL:
Senthilkumaran S, Ananth C, Gore SB, Thirumalaikolundusubramanian P. Cadmium toxicity in silversmith: Safety is never too much!. Indian J Occup Environ Med [serial online] 2014 [cited 2019 Aug 25];18:163. Available from: http://www.ijoem.com/text.asp?2014/18/3/163/146919


Dear Sir,

The article by Parikh et al. [1] is indeed interesting and a timely reminder for the systematic surveillance of health status among silversmiths and enforcement of adequate use of personal protective equipments/measures. In developing countries such as India, silver jewelry manufacturing is an important cottage industry and this business is run traditionally from father to son, and carried out by the family members at home. Occupational health and safety research in developing countries are mainly focused on large-scale industries. There are no strict enforcement of rules and regulations for family-run cottage industries.

Silver is usually mixed with 20%-30% cadmium and then it is used to make silver jewelry. During this process, there is a formation of cadmium fumes, which are inhaled by the workers. Subacute to chronic cadmium exposure from "silver solder" has been well recognized in the fabrication of jewels and in other industrial brazing applications. Cadmium is highly toxic to various biological systems of which the respiratory tract is a key target organ. Acute cadmium inhalation is associated with acute lung injury and diffuse alveolar damage. [2] In animal models, repeated exposure to cadmium fumes has lead to emphysema. [3] A recent Indian study by Moitra et al. [4] had documented decrements in lung function among those involved in jewellery works due to chronic exposure to cadmium fumes. Sethi et al., [5] had reported a case of cadmium-induced peripheral neuropathy, nephropathy, and decreased bone density. Both reports warrants for comprehensive health and safety management program to prevent the organ toxicity.

Prevention programs shall include technological improvements, development of safer substitutes, appropriate ventilation of the work place, education of training of workers on the hazards of cadmium exposure, and adoption of suitable precautions. Long-term exposure to lower cadmium concentrations should be considered a future occupational health issue, as cadmium confounds many physiological processes. Occupational health issues are often given less attention in medical education and training. As a result, occupational illnesses are not considered in clinical teaching or rounds.

 
  References Top

1.
Parikh JM, Dhareshwar S, Sharma A, Karanth R, Ramkumar VS, Ramaiah I. Acute respiratory distress in a silversmith. Indian J Occup Environ Med 2014;18:27-8.  Back to cited text no. 1
[PUBMED]  Medknow Journal  
2.
Panchal L, Vaideeswar P. Acute lung injury due to cadmium inhalation-a case report. Indian J Pathol Microbiol 2006;49:265-6.  Back to cited text no. 2
[PUBMED]    
3.
Kirschvink N, Martin N, Fievez L, Smith N, Marlin D, Gustin P. Airway inflammation in cadmium-exposed rats is associated with pulmonary oxidative stress and emphysema. Free Radic Res 2006;40:241-50.  Back to cited text no. 3
    
4.
Moitra S, Blanc PD, Sahu S. Adverse respiratory effects associated with cadmium exposure in small-scale jewellery workshops in India. Thorax 2013;68:565-70.  Back to cited text no. 4
    
5.
Sethi PK, Khandelwal D, Sethi N. Cadmium exposure: Health hazards of silver cottage industry in developing countries. J Med Toxicol 2006;2:14-5.  Back to cited text no. 5
    




 

Top
Print this article  Email this article