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 REVIEW ARTICLE
Year : 2017  |  Volume : 21  |  Issue : 3  |  Page : 101-104

Green Tobacco Sickness: A Brief Review


1 Department of Public Health Dentistry, H.P. Govt. Dental College, Shimla, Himachal Pradesh, India
2 Department of Radiation Oncology, Regional Cancer Center, Indira Gandhi Medical College, Shimla, Himachal Pradesh, India

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Shailee Fotedar
Department of Public Health Dentistry, H.P. Govt. Dental College, Shimla, Himachal Pradesh
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/ijoem.IJOEM_160_17

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Green tobacco sickness (GTS) is the condition that mainly affects the tobacco harvesters. The condition is prevalent in Asian and South American tobacco harvesters. The present review was conducted to discuss the etiology, epidemiology, symptoms, and prevention of GTS. It is caused by the absorption of nicotine through the skin while the workers are engaged in handling the uncured tobacco leaves. The symptoms include nausea, vomiting, pallor, dizziness, headaches, increased perspiration, chills, abdominal pain, diarrhea, increased salivation, prostration, weakness, breathlessness, and occasional lowering of blood pressure. The prevalence of GTS varies from 8.2 to 47% globally. The use of personal protective equipment like water-resistant clothing, chemical-resistant gloves, plastic aprons, and rain-suits with boots should be used by the tobacco farmers to prevent its occurrence. An international-level awareness campaign has to be taken up and more stringent workers safety regulations have to be formulated.






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