Indian Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine   Official publication of Indian Association of  0ccupational  Health  
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 ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2020  |  Volume : 24  |  Issue : 2  |  Page : 96-101

Impacts of occupational cognitive failure and subjective workload on patient safety incidents among intensive care units nurses


1 Rasoul-e-Akram Hospital, MSN, Guilan Social Security Organization, Guilan University of Medical Sciences, Rasht, Iran
2 Department of Nursing (Medical-Surgical), School of Nursing and Midwifery, Guilan University of Medical Sciences, Rasht, Iran
3 Department of Statistics, School of Nursing and Midwifery, Guilan University of Medical Sciences, Rasht, Iran
4 Social Determinants of Health Research Center (SDHRC), Guilan University of Medical Sciences, Rasht, Iran

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Nazila Javadi-Pashaki
School of Nursing and Midwifery, Guilan University of Medical Sciences (GUMS), Rasht
Iran
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/ijoem.IJOEM_22_20

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Background: Life-saving treatments and high-quality care techniques increase the opportunity for patient safety incidents in Intensive care unit. Aims: This descriptive correlation study aimed to determine the impacts of occupational cognitive failure and subjective workload on patient safety incidents among intensive care units nurses. Methods and Material: One hundred seventy-six nurses working in intensive care units were included using census sampling. The data collection tools consisted of demographic and occupational data, standard questionnaires of subjective workload (NASA-TLX) and occupational cognitive failure (OCFQ), and a question about frequency of patient safety incidents. Data analysis was performed using Mann–Whitney and Kruskal–Wallis, Spearman rank correlation coefficient, and logistic regression tests. Results: Occupational cognitive failure (OR = 1.043), subjective workload in dimension of “performance” (OR = 0.982), age (OR = 0.947), and gender (OR = 3.726) were important predictive variables of patient safety incidents. Conclusions: Nursing mangers and policymakers can consider the factors identified for staffing nurses and development of patient safety programs.






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